Koi & Pond Water Care


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Pond Water Quality

Pond Ammonia
Pond Nitrite
Pond Nitrate
Pond pH
Pond pH Crash
Pond Dissolved Oxygen
Pond Hydrogen Sulfide
Pond Water Changes
Pond CO2

Parasites Main

Koi Flukes
Koi Trichodina
Koi Costia
Koi Chilodonella
Koi Ich
(White Spot)

Medications Main

Salt
Formalin
Praziquantel
Diflubenzuron
Potassium Permanganate
Acrilavine
Chloramine T

Shotgun Remedy

Feeding Koi

Go Green 100% Natural Aquameds

The New Generation of
Beneficial Pond Bacteria
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No Harsh Chemicals
Pond Care Treatments

Deadly Bacteria Control
Remove Bottom Sludge
Remove Ammonia Spikes
Control Organic Growth
Maintain a Healthy Pond
Winter Pond Care

Pond Ammonia

Ammonia is the primary waste product of pond fish, excreted primarily through the gill tissue, but to a lesser extent via the kidney. Ammonia can also accumulate from the decay of koi fish tissues, food and other organic debris derived from protein. Ammonia accumulations cause reddening of the skin of your koi and disability of the gills by its direct caustic effect on these surfaces. Koi Fish suffering in water with high ammonia accumulations will isolate themselves, lie on the bottom, clamp their fins, secrete excess slime, and are much more susceptible to parasitic and bacterial infection.

Ammonia is a big problem in new systems because the bacteria that would naturally dissolve ammonia are not established, see discussion of cycle. As well, even in established water gardens and koi ponds systems, ammonia may accumulate in springtime when the water is cold but fish are eating, because filter bacteria have not emerged usefully from hibernation.

Ammonia is capable of ionization below pH 7.4 and so in its ionized state is less toxic to garden pond fish.

Above pH 8.0 most ammonia is ionized, and so becomes more toxic. Care should be taken not to increase the pH of a koi pond system if ammonia is present but the need to drop the pH or restrict oxygenation in koifish ponds to tanks of fish to keep pH down will cause stress to your pond fish. is an overrated aberration in the literature.

Treatment: Water changes (with Dechlor) and management of the pH near neutral will go a long way to cutting losses from Ammonias, ancillary, less useful modes of Ammonia management include the use of the various water conditioners that bind ammonia, and the application of rechargeable Zeolites to the system filter. I am still going to tell you that time and water changes are the two mainstays, however.

Pond water that is warm, high in pH (There's a test) or deprived of oxygen will have an enhanced toxicity when ammonias are accumulating. These are all important considerations as we try to interpret the varying symptomatology of fish at the same ammonia level, for example, but are affected very differently

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Fish Medicine
Learn about fish medicines, what they do, and where to get them.

PondCrisis.com
If you have a koi, pond or fish problem, this site takes you through twenty easy questions and at the end you know what you need to fix in your pond to create restored Koi health.

KoiCrisis.com
Koi Crisis has a symptoms chart by system you can choose the symptom by fish part, and resolve a lot of Koi pond fish problems or at least, learn about them understand how to remedy them.

Koi Food & Feeding
What should you feed your koi? How many times per day? Is Corn really that bad in a Koi diet? What are the most common feeding mistakes people make? What's the best food? Help With Koi Problems